Tree Life

Tree Life

Deciduous Forest Biome

VISIT BIOME

At first glance, the word deciduous can be a little bit confusing. Deciduous simply means falling off at a particular season. So, deciduous forest is a kind of biome where leaves fall off the trees when winter knocks.

Coniferous Forest Biome

VISIT BIOME

A coniferous forest biome is chiefly made up of cone-bearing or coniferous trees, for example, pines, fir, hemlocks, spruces, cedars, cypresses, redwoods, yews, Douglass firs, larches, and kauris.

Temperate Rainforest Biome

VISIT BIOME

A Temperate rainforest biome is a type of rainforest biome occurring in a temperate climate – vast amounts of rainfall, but cooler temperature compared to tropical rainforests.

Tropical Rainforest Biome

VISIT BIOME

Tropical rainforest biome is an ecology or ecosystem composed of mainly vegetation community where the trees are closely spaced, and the crowns interact with each other to result in an unbroken canopy of plants.

Our Biome

Biome means a major ecological community, extending over a large area and usually characterised by a dominant vegetation, such as forests. As we see in the links above these ecological communities house a mass of vegetation and wildlife and they all adapt to the forests atmosphere, which in turn adapts to the movements of the Earth. By the viewing of this movement we pull out our world view, adapting to the lands growth and returning what we take.

A day in the life of the individual

A tree’s root system works to absorb water and minerals from the soil, anchor the tree to the ground, and store food reserves for the winter. They also expand well beyond the dripline, often occupying an area two to four times the size of the tree crown, so when you are next to a tree you’re not under it, but you are still on it. It is made up of two kinds of roots: large perennial roots and smaller, short-lived feeder roots. It is the smaller roots/root hairs that gather the nutrients and water needed for the trees process of survival. (  https://www.extension.iastate.edu/forestry/tree_biology/101roots.html )

                                  

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